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What is Energy Medicine?

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What is Energy Medicine

Energy Medicine is based on the understanding that any physical, mental, or behavioural problem has a counterpart in the body’s energies and can be treated at that level. It provides a holistic approach to healing by not only addressing your body, mind, and spirit, but also by working with your emotions, past trauma, and even your relationships.

So what is “Energy’

Over the centuries energy in the body has been given different names such as Qi (Chi), Prana, Innate Intelligence, Mana, Pneuma, Vital fluid, Odic force, and Orgone.

After many years denying the existence and importance of this energy within our bodies, science is now discovering methods of measuring it. There is more information at the bottom of this blog.

The belief among healers is that when our energy is blocked, stagnant or disrupted our physical bodies cannot function optimally. This imbalance can also lead to disease and ill-health.

Energy Medicine

For thousands of years, practitioners around the world have activated the body’s natural healing processes through clearing meridians, balancing energy, healing touch, utilising Ayurvedic medicine, shamanic practices, applying hands-on healing such as Reiki, and many other modalities.

The many different healing modalities that fall under the category of Energy Medicine may be referred to as energy therapy, energy healing, vibrational medicine, psychic healing, spiritual medicine or spiritual healing, you can find the different categories with Detox at the Amity Wellness Resort, they offer the best options to energy medicine.

All of these modalities will work to affect the energy in our body and to assist us to become balanced, grounded, to tap into our innate healing power within, and to release and resolve traumas.

Traditional Western medicine focuses on diagnosing symptoms and treating you from the outside. When used in combination with Energy Medicine the results can be profound as the whole person is addressed.

Benefits of Energy Medicine

Energy medicine has been shown to have many benefits.

These include calming the nervous system, releasing trapped emotions and traumas, bringing calm and a sense of peace.

In this way Energy Medicine can help with anxiety, depression, PTSD, relieving pain and fatigue, improving sleep, it can bring more confidence, more focus and more connection to others, it can also can help clients be less reactive and improve relationships.

Energy Medicine Modalities

These are just some of the Energy Medicine approaches available:

Hands-on Therapies

Approaches such as Reiki, Chakra Balancing, Energy Healing, Tantric Healing, Pranic Healing, Esoteric Healing, Magnetic / Auric Healing, Healing Touch, Hands of Light, Body Talk and Therapeutic Touch involve the healer laying their hands on the body or holding them in the auric field around the body.

Crystals and Magnets

These can be used either on the body or close to the body to affect the energy flow.

Acupuncture / Acupressure

Acupuncture and Acupressure are an ancient modality which uses very fine needles or finger / hand pressure to affect the meridians or energy lines within the body

Reflexology

The reflexologist uses pressure, usually with their fingers, on the reflex points of the hands or feet. This affects the energy within the body.

Distant healing, intercessory prayer

The healer works from a distance either with prayer or by using intentional energy healing such as Reiki. The recipient will often feel the effects of the energy during the session.

Exercise and Movement

There are a number of systems using meditation, breath and movement to positively affect the energy within the body by cleansing, strengthening, and circulating it. They include Tai Chi, Qi Gong (Ch’i Kung) and Yoga.

Combination Therapies

Acupressure and Tai Chi can be used together to provide hands on treatment along with Tai Chi exercises to be used at home. This allows the healing to continue.

Emotional Blueprint: This unique system uses reflexology to read the emotions that are stored within your body, in combination with visualisation and journeying. This allows you to connect with these emotions, to release them and established new, more beneficial patterns in their place.

Conclusion

Energy Medicine has something to offer everyone, whether you just need to relax and enjoy some “Me Time”, or you have deeper physical and emotional / mental health concerns that you wish to alleviate.

It is an excellent complement to Western Medicine and to other Alternative Health Modalities. It is safe for anyone from young children to seniors.

 

Scientific Measurement of Energy

Indirect measurement of subtle energy in the body is possible through certain physiological correlates that are emerging.

Instruments to measure acupuncture activity and Kirlian photography (electrical discharge photography) are the two main contenders for subtle energy monitoring.

Acupuncture instruments are based on the observation that acupuncture points have special electrical characteristics; the points have lower resistance to electrical current flow as compared to the surrounding tissues. As each meridian is associated with one or more organs inside the body, the electrical activity of the acupoint seems to be related to the organ function.

In the second kind of instrument, based on Kirlian photography, a high voltage, low current is applied to the finger pads. The colourful discharge that is observed is analyzed in a computer and is related to organ function.

Sophisticated instruments are presently available based on these principles. These instruments are undergoing many trials and clinical evaluation, so that their use can become acceptable in medical diagnostics and therapy.

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How to gain relief from Fibromyalgia

If the princess that Hans Christen Anderson created in The Princess and The Pea, told me she had tossed and turned all night and woke up feeling bruised, black and blue, I would suspect fibromyalgia not a pea under twenty mattresses.

Approximately 15% of the population suffer from the pain of fibromyalgia. Many of these are women who work hard, aim for perfection and sleep poorly. Slowly over a period of weeks and sometimes months, pain creeps up on them.  Their brains become foggy as they are fatigued from poor sleep and living with pain advances. Eventually, they are told they have fibromyalgia.

What causes fibromyalgia?

Like many illnesses, no specific cause has been found for fibromyalgia. It appears to be a series of cascading events which trigger physical and mental challenges. There may be a lingering viral or Candida infection and accompanying nutritional deficiencies. Often the full spectrum of fibromyalgia is brought on by a physical trauma such as a car accident or falling off a bike. The physical trauma is the proverbial straw that breaks the camel’s back.

How to get relief from fibromyalgia

Because the fibromyalgia has several causes and results of different symptoms, a multi-factorial approach brings the most comfort. Such an approach includes dietary changes, exercise, deeper sleep, enhanced mind/body awareness, body therapies and herbal medicine.

Diet

Dietary changes are hard to make. Begin with simple changes. For example, substitute an apple for the sugar fix in the mid-afternoon. Order a salad with chicken instead of hamburger and fries at lunch. Replace flavoured (highly sugared) yoghurt with plain and add fresh fruit.

Exercise

Many with fibromyalgia find it very difficult to exercise, as the pain limits their movement. Like dietary changes, begin slowly and be gentle with limitations. Some recommend short periods of aerobic exercise three times a week. I also recommend yoga, Tai chi and a walk around the block in the evening.

Sleep

There are many ways to improve sleep. The easiest is to take a calcium supplement before bed. Calcium relaxes muscles, helping the body unwind. Melatonin taken with the calcium will calm the mind. Together they enhance sleep.

For those that wake through the night, a bedside herbal remedy for sleep which includes hops (Humulus lupus) and valerian (Valeriana officinalis) will ease one back to sleep.

Good sleep hygiene involves taking the TV and clutter out of the bedroom, sleeping in the dark and going to bed at the same time every night and getting up at the same time every morning.

Mindfulness and meditation

Many have found relief by changing their relationship to the pain. Meditation and creative visualisations can be used to develop distance from the pain. This, in turn, decreases the sense of being overwhelmed by the pain and gives room to breathe a little deeper. Deeper breathing results in a calmer mind/body experience.

In the book, The Full Catastrophe of Life: Using the Wisdom of Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain and Illness, Jon Kabat-Zinn documents his experience of using meditation to help others manage chronic pain at the Massatcheush Medical Centre. I highly recommend this book.

Body therapies

Treatments that involve laying on hands, such as Cranio-sacral can bring relief from the pain as well as release emotional tensions associated with chronic illness. These types of therapies are often important in the initial stages of finding wellness, as they are excellent tools to relax muscles.

Herbal medicine

In herbal medicine, the protocol often has several stages: gentle cleansing, increase relaxation and help with recovery from long term stress. 

Herbs like yellow dock (Rumex Crispus), red clover (Trifolium pretense) and burdock root (Articum lappa) will help move toxins from the body without stressing the body further. 

Herbs that relieve the chronic gnawing of the pain on the mind are used simultaneously; these include skullcap (Scutellaria latrafolia) and green oat seeds (Avena sativa). 

You can even use cbd capsules to get instant relief from chronic pain and as each tablet is specified to a certain gram thus there can be no mistake of consuming it less or even more under any circumstances.

Herbs that relax muscles are essential, cramp bark (Viburnum opulus) and valerian (Valeriana officinalis) are two that are frequently used.

Then there are the adaptogens, which I like to say gives life space. These include Rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) and ashwagandha (Withania somnifera). Adaptogens will build the body’s resistance to stress.

A topical salve of cayenne (Capsicum minimum) is also essential for symptomatic pain relief.

And, finally, patience!

The knots of fibromyalgia take time to tighten, and unravelling them also requires time, but with patience, it can be done.

One morning, I am sure, the princess woke to the sun shining, stretched and felt refresh from a deep nights sleep.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do have Fibromyalgia? What have you tried to help with their symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

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Trauma and Fibromyalgia - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

Emotional, Physical and Sexual Trauma and Fibromyalgia

Many people living with fibromyalgia can trace their symptoms back to a particularly traumatic event such as a car accident or injury. Others have experienced short or long term emotional, sexual or physical trauma as a child or adult.

Understanding the link with trauma may help bring some relief.

Fibromyalgia and trauma

Until more recently the relevance of traumatic experiences and stressors, especially during childhood, have been overlooked as predisposing factors in the development of various chronic pain disorders and psychiatric conditions. These include fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Physical, emotional and sexual abuse all trigger high levels of cortisol and adrenaline in our bodies. Chronic or long term stimulation of these fight/flight hormones weakens the immune system, and affects the health of the digestive system, energy production, and heightens our pain perception.

According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, the most common traumatic stressors affecting children include accidents, physical or sexual trauma or abuse, neglect, and exposure to domestic and community violence. Other impactful stressors include

Other impactful stressors include the death of a family member, divorce, drug or alcohol abuse, and natural disasters.

These traumatic stressors precondition the neurological system and the stress response system to produce exaggerated responses to normal stimuli (hypervigilance), especially when they are experienced during childhood.

Fibromyalgia and the irritable bowel syndrome associated with it are examples of hyper vigilant neurological responses. Normal stimuli such as clothing rubbing against the skin, or even wind on the face, can produce painful sensations in those with fibromyalgia, indicating an exaggerated pain response.

Normal stimuli such as clothing rubbing against the skin, or even wind on the face, can produce painful sensations in those with fibromyalgia, indicating an exaggerated pain response. Also, the muscles of the intestine are inappropriately stimulated by normal stressors, leading to alternating constipation and spastic

In addition, the muscles of the intestine are inappropriately stimulated by normal stressors, leading to alternating constipation and spastic diarrhea, classic signs of irritable bowel syndrome. The heightened pain response will also cause abdominal pain.

The link with PTSD

John D Otis, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry at Boston University, has studied the link between PTSD in veterans and fibromyalgia.

He has found that a large number of them experience fibromyalgia and other chronic pain conditions which are unrelated to any physical injuries.

Physical traumas

There is a great deal of evidence that physical injuries such as those sustained in a car accident or fall will trigger fibromyalgia, often developing some time after the event.

It is believed by some scientists that the physical trauma may actually cause biochemical changes in the brain. For example, accidents, injuries, or sudden trauma to the central nervous system may result in the different symptoms of severe muscle pain, fatigue, sleep problems, depression, and other conditions associated with fibromyalgia.

However, these events also cause emotional trauma, so it is not fully understood whether it is the physical or emotional stress that triggers the response, or a combination of the two.

It is apparent, therefore, that consideration of emotional trauma is essential when assessing and seeking to treat fibromyalgia.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do you have Fibromyalgia? What have you tried to help their symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

Here you can read some useful tips noted by Mike G Law on named traumas from law point of view.

Visit Sublime Wellness Center today for more information.

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Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Matter of Boundaries

Fibromyalgia (FM) affects 1.5% (444, 000) of Canadians over 12 years of age (1). Those who are most affected are women, people over 40, smokers, the obese, low-income earners, and the physically inactive (1).
However, it is unclear whether or not low income, educational status, smoking, and physical inactivity are consequences or determinants of the disease.

People who suffer from FM have disturbed sleep due to chronic systemic muscular and skeletal pain. Often FM co-occurs with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a condition characterised by disabling physical and cognitive exhaustion. Unfortunately, 2 out of every three people with CFS and FM have at least three other chronic health conditions (1). As a result, CFS and FM cause significant impairment and stress, both at work and at home.

So how does one develop CFS or FM?

About 50% of CFS patients can recall a viral infection triggering their CFS. Others triggers include motor vehicle accidents, surgery, or an unexpected fall (2). Also, adverse effects of some psychiatric medications may cause overwhelming fatigue.

It is not uncommon for digestive complaints to occur in the presence of CFS and FM (3). Optimizing your digestive function through the use of mindful eating, an elimination diet, and hypoallergenic diet may help to lessen the digestive burden. Your naturopath may also opt for botanicals and supplements to increase digestive function. These interventions may include digestive enzymes and bitters.

Regarding possible vitamin deficiencies in FM and CFS, it is important to know your vitamin B12 status. Deficiency of B12 can lead to anemia, and fatigue (4). Your family doctor and your naturopath can test for serum values of vitamin B12.

Other nutrients are shown to be helpful in improving symptoms of CFS and FM target mitochondria and glutathione; the powerhouse of the cell, and your body’s primary antioxidant, respectively. These nutrients include N-Acetylcysteine, Alpha-Lipoic Acid, L-Carnitine, and CoQ10.

Some environmental triggers to avoid when living with a diagnosis of CFS and FM include changes in sleep schedule, exposure to the cold, physical & mental overexertion, sensory & information overload, excessive stress, prolonged driving & air travel, alcohol and caffeine.

A matter of boundaries

Above all, scheduling “me time” and setting boundaries (both emotional and personal) will help to build energy and reduce the risk of burnout (3).

For more information on what can be done to improve your symptoms of FM & CFS, and to find the specific nutritional protocol best suited for you, contact your local naturopath.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do you have Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? What have you tried to help their symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

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Can Fibromyalgia be caused by food allergies - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

Can Fibromyalgia be caused by food allergies?

The Short Answer Is “Yes, Food Allergies Can Be A Part Of The Picture.”

In fact, allergies, sensitivities and intolerances to foods can trigger a variety of unexpected health conditions including chronic pain and inflammatory conditions such as fibromyalgia.

My Experience

I have been practising as a natural allergist since 2004, and in that time I have found that so many of my clients presenting with fibromyalgia can find relief simply by identifying and eliminating foods to which they are reacting.

Some people find this hard to grasp, especially for those who do not have accompanying digestive issues.So often I hear: ‘What? The food I am eating is causing my pain? But I have no digestive

So often I hear: ‘What? The food I am eating is causing my pain? But I have no digestive issues!”

It is important to remember that foods are ingested and therefore affect us systemically. This means they can cause symptoms in ANY part of our bodies – this includes skin, breathing, hormone balance, mood, energy levels and brain function.

They can trigger inflammation and auto-immune responses in the body and can cause the body to attack its tissues.

If you are diagnosed with fibromyalgia, your doctor will usually recommend medications. However, you may want to consider making some straight forward lifestyle changes such as exercise, sleep strategies, stress reduction and eliminating the foods to which you react. For some, this is enough to be able to reduce or completely alleviate the need to take medication.

Case study

Let’s take a client of mine – we will call her Maggie.

She had been given a diagnosis of fibromyalgia and was complaining of digestive issues, migraines, chronic pain and fatigue. She was living on meds for her pain and inflammation, and it was the only way she could get through the day. When asked if there were alternative approaches, her doctor told her there was no solution, and to take the meds.

During her first visit to me, we determined that she was reacting to specific grains in her diet, in particular, wheat and corn, along with various other allergens including milk products, refined sugar, coffee, night shade vegetables (tomato, bell peppers, white potatoes) and artificial additives and sweeteners, especially aspartame and MSG.

She was very sceptical; however, she was so fed up with having such a poor quality of life that she agreed to try changing her diet. Within a week of removing the identified allergens, she considered her pain to be less than half the level it had been before changing her diet. She had also regained much of her energy.

It took several months, and some careful rethinking of her diet, but she is now almost entirely free from pain, and no longer needs her medication.

For Maggie, the real test was when she tried re-introducing the foods that she had eliminated.

Within a few days all her old symptoms were back, and in her own words, “The treat was not worth it!”

Another client, Paul, while seeking answers to his fibromyalgia had eventually been identified as celiac (intolerant to wheat and gluten), with many of the associated celiac symptoms, including skin rash, bad digestion, constant chesty cough, body pain and fatigue.

On the advice of his doctor he had removed wheat and gluten from his diet; however, the improvement in his symptoms was only moderate.

Paul suspected there might be other foods that affected him and refusing to accept that he would have to live with his condition and poor quality of life, he sought answers.

We identified several other food allergens, which had not shown up on the traditional skin or blood testing.  Removing these from his diet has given him much of his quality of life back.

In summary

As you make changes to your diet, keep in mind that people with fibromyalgia tend to benefit most from taking a variety of approaches to managing their symptoms.

Taking any medications your doctor may prescribe for pain or other symptoms is always an option; however, you may wish to seek a more natural approach.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do have Fibromyalgia? What have you tried to help with their symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

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Fibromyalgia Symptoms and Diagnosis - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

Fibromyalgia Symptoms and Diagnosis

Fibromyalgia symptoms can be ambiguous and varied which makes it a complex condition to diagnose accurately. Most doctors have heard of the disease but have little in depth knowledge of its true nature.

According to Dr David Brady, Functional Medicine Practitioner and author of the Fibro Fix, doctors often use fibromyalgia as a “throwaway diagnosis” for a patient presenting with nonspecific pain and fatigue.

Dr Brady has studied Fibromyalgia for the past 20 years. It is his mission to help educate both doctors and the public about the true nature of the condition.

In this vein, on a podcast, Dr Brady gave an excellent outline on the exact origin and fibromyalgia symptoms. He also gave a fascinating insight into how to diagnose fibromyalgia correctly.

The Origin of Fibromyalgia Symptoms

According to Dr Brady, if you ask any doctor, “What is fibromyalgia?” their answer is, “it’s a muscle problem”. In reality, the origin of the condition is in the central nervous system (CNS). The problem originates in the CNS and is expressed or perceived elsewhere in the body.

The problem originates in the CNS and is expressed or perceived elsewhere in the body.

Fibromyalgia Symptoms

1. Pain

According to Dr Brady, the pain of fibromyalgia has particular characteristics which include;

  1. People with fibromyalgia often comment that they “hurt everywhere”. They have “global pain” rather than hurting in many different areas of the body.
  2. People with fibromyalgia pain feel it in the soft tissues such as the ligaments, muscles and tendons. The pain is not usually of the joints. It is not arthritis. If there is joint pain, then that may suggest a type of inflammatory joint disease such as Rheumatoid arthritis.
  3. The pain is constant and does not come and go.
  4. People with fibromyalgia are hypotensive to touch.
  5. Pain is not the only symptom of fibromyalgia. There are always other associated symptoms such as fatigue.

2. Fatigue

Fibromyalgia fatigue is often persistent, ongoing where the person does not have much energy at all.

3. Insomnia

People with fibromyalgia have specific problems with their sleep. These issues include:

  1. They find it hard to go to sleep because of a “racing mind”.
  2. They sleep for an abnormally long time, up to 14 hours.
  3. On rising, they feel like they have slept.

4. Digestive

Dr Brady associates fibromyalgia with hypersensitive gastrointestinal symptoms such as:

  1. A lot of bloating and gas particularly after eating.
  2. Often there is constipation and occasionally diarrhoea.

After negative finding from testing by gastroenterologist these symptoms are often diagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Studies show that there is a 100% correlation with fibromyalgia and the person also fitting the criteria for irritable bowel syndrome.

The opposite is not true. So not all people with IBS have fibromyalgia.

5. Mood

Dr Brady characterises fibromyalgia by anxiety and some level of depression.

6. Early Life Trauma

People with Fibromyalgia have often experienced some level of early life trauma. This trauma could be physical, sexual or verbal abuse.

But also it could be from being brought up in an unstable environment due to:

  1. Moving homes often.
  2. Being a child of divorce.
  3. A rancorous relationship between the mother and father.
  4. An authoritative, demanding parent, particularly a father figure to a young girl where she could never feel she would measure up, never be good enough no matter how well she did.

7. Gender

Research shows that fibromyalgia occurs in women more than men.

Diagnosis of Exclusion

Unlike Diabetes or Hypothyroidism, there is no medical test for Fibromyalgia. As such, Fibromyalgia is a diagnosis of exclusion.

This conclusion means that a person should only be diagnosed with Fibromyalgia when all other possible reasons for their symptoms have been ruled out.

According to Dr Brady, three main possible conditions may mimic Fibromyalgia. These conditions include:

  1. Hypothyroidism
  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction
  3. Myofascial pain

A healthcare practitioner should rule out the above conditions before making a diagnosis of Fibromyalgia.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do have Fibromyalgia? What have you tried to help with their symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

Like what you’ve read? Sign up for FREE updates delivered to your inbox.


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Ottawa Holistic Wellness, 356 MacLaren Street, Ottawa, ON, K2P 0M6, https://www.ottawaholisticwellness.ca. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact

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