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ADHD Drugs, Diet and Naturopathic Medicine - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

ADHD Drugs, Diet and Naturopathic Medicine

I recently watched a stand-up comedy special starring Norm MacDonald. He was commenting on his childhood, and how all he wanted to do while sitting in a classroom was to go outside and play with a big tree branch.

He then wondered about hyperactive kids today and their feelings about being stuck in a classroom with the addition of authority figures yelling, “Now we’re going to drug you.”

While this commentary is an oversimplification of the plight of modern kids, it does raise the question of whether or not medications are the only option when dealing with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Diagnosis

Researchers estimate that 5% of all Canadian children ages 3 to 9 fit the criteria for a diagnosis of ADHD (1). Boys are more commonly affected. Inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, in both the classroom and at home, are the main symptoms of ADHD.

The recent changes to the DSM-V (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) now include details to help doctors identify ADHD in adults, and changes the previous age cutoff in children from 7 to 12 years old (2).

It is important to not jump to a quick diagnosis of ADHD, as many other disorders mimic it.

Autism and ADD / ADHD

Often, Children who are on the autism spectrum often have ADHD.

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is often mistaken for ADHD. In ODD, children display angry and irritable mood, argumentative or defiant behaviour, or vindictiveness for at least six months.

Children and adults with ODD will direct their anger towards at least one person who is not a sibling and will have significant problems at work, in the classroom, or at home (3).

While children with ODD are more likely also to have a learning disability, the important issue here is to receive a thorough workup and diagnosis from a trained psychologist. An accurate diagnosis will ensure that appropriate treatment for you or your child.

ADHD Drugs

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that preschool children with ADHD receive behavioural therapy as a first line treatment.

In school children with ADHD, stimulant ADHD drugs like methylphenidate (aka Ritalin) and atomoxetine are considered first line treatment (4).

Common side effects of these ADHD drugs include reduced appetite and weight loss, problems sleeping, and stunted growth. Long-term use of methylphenidate can also lead to depletion of zinc in children with ADHD (5).

When supplemented with zinc + methylphenidate, children with ADHD in a 2004 study improved in teacher and parent rating scales compared to children taking placebo + methylphenidate (6).

Diet and Allergies

In a 2016 a retrospective study of around 4200 children in the Netherlands, researchers found that children with ADHD were more likely to be medicated for asthma, seasonal allergies, and eczema.

Furthermore, ADHD was deemed to be more common in children whose parents were taking medications for asthma and seasonal allergies (7).

In 2015, a systematic review of hypoallergenic diets for children with ADHD found a small but significant improvement in symptom severity (8).

Another 2015 study showed that supplementing fish oil into children’s diets for 16 weeks brought down both inflammatory markers and ADHD symptom severity (9).

Summary

The reality is that some people require ADHD drugs to control their symptoms.

A variety of naturopathic interventions can target the side effects of commonly prescribed ADHD medications, ADHD symptoms, and conditions often found alongside ADD / ADHD like allergies and digestive concerns.

Speak with your Naturopathic Doctor to find out which interventions are best suited for you or your child.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Does your child have ADHD? What have you tried to help their symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)- Finding Physical and Emotional Well Being - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Finding Physical and Emotional Well Being

Having an urgency to run to the toilet at all times of the day?

Do you have abdominal pain that improves after passing a bowel movement?

Bloating and gas with loose and/or constipated stools?

An estimated 5 million Canadians suffer from IBS, with 120,000 new cases each year (Fedorak RN, et al. 2012). 40% of Canadians suffering from severe IBS symptoms seek medical treatment, while patients with milder symptoms use a combination of lifestyle changes, food trigger avoidance, pharmaceuticals, and/or supplements to manage their wellbeing.

The typical IBS sufferer misses 13 days of work per year (Fedorak RN, et al. 2012).

Who gets IBS?

You have an increased risk for IBS if you have a family history of a first-degree relative (parent or sibling) with IBS. Onset is usually in teenage years and is more common in women than men. This may be because women are more likely than men to seek health care services for their symptoms.

Also, clinical trials indicate that gender differences occur in responsiveness to drug treatment, pain processing, transit time (the time it takes for your food to move through your digestive tract), and effects of hormones (estrogen, progesterone) on digestive functions (Anbardan SJ., et al. 2012).

Do you have IBS?

A doctor will diagnose IBS if symptoms have been present at least three days per month in the last three months, started at least six months ago, and symptoms (specifically, abdominal pain) are relieved after a bowel movement (Jung HK, 2011).

Symptoms include more or less frequent bowel movements, change in stool appearance, and incomplete emptying of bowels. You may also have bloating, heartburn, and nausea (Jung HK, 2011).

Other diagnostic methods should be used to rule out more serious conditions like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease.

What causes IBS?

Some of the known causes of IBS include a history of gut infections, abdominal surgery, changes in diet, antibiotic use, and/or bacterial/hormonal/neurotransmitter imbalances. IBS pain is tied to the evolution in a healthy human microbiota (the friendly microbes in our gut), the immune system, and brain-gut communication (Grice EA, 2012).

Think of brain-gut communication as our mind-body connection, one that exists through the central (mind) and enteric (gut) nervous systems.

Peristalsis is coordinated muscle contraction that promotes movement of food through the GI tract. In IBS, irregular peristalsis (spasm) can slow transit time or increase it causing constipation or diarrhea, respectively.

Some home remedies

Peppermint oil

This is a useful tool for managing IBS symptoms (Cash et al., 2016). Menthol, an essential oil, is an antispasmodic and can help to calm the muscular and mucosal (mucus) walls of the intestine, reducing abdominal pain and regulating peristalsis (Khanna et al., 2014).

In an Egyptian text from 1550 BC, mint was indicated for abdominal pain. In ancient Greece, Hades softened a spell on his mistress Minthe, so that ‘when people walked upon his lover they would smell her sweetness’.

Probiotics

Similar to peppermint, probiotics can be an effective symptom management tool.

Studies have shown that certain probiotic strains, specifically the lactobacillus and bifidobacterium families, can relieve symptoms of abdominal pain, gas, and bloating (Majeed et al., 2016) (Moraes-Filho JP., Quigley EM, 2015).

However, not everyone has the same reaction to probiotics.

To give some perspective, the human microbiota (the friendly microbes in our gut) is the size of an ocean compared to the small droplet of probiotics delivered to our bodies by supplements. Scientists still have many questions regarding the human microbiota. Does it control us? Do we control it? If so, how? The complex relationship between our mind and our microbiota is one that can be slightly altered by diet, environment, and our stress level (Grice et al., 2012).

Dietary changes

The ability of your body to fully digest and absorb the calories from the food you eat is controlled by your microbiota (Grice et al., 2012).

Avoiding dietary triggers that alter the capacity of friendly microbes, and possibly feed the bad ones, is an important goal to reduce inflammation within the digestive tract. Our microbes have the ability to heal the gut wall and mucosa, so the diet and lifestyle factors necessary are those that create the ideal conditions for the friendly bugs we were born with.

Acupuncture

Acupuncture, a useful tool in IBS management, assesses and treats the individual patient holistically. IBS patients receiving acupuncture for symptom management reported greater improvement than patients receiving only pharmaceutical drugs (Manheimer et al., 2012).

The Mind – Body connection

It is important to remember that IBS affects both physical and mental-emotional wellbeing. You should seek a health care professional who will provide an IBS treatment plan that addresses both physical and psychological factors. IBS can be tough to deal with, but its symptoms can be managed and so can your stress.

Remember: Always consult a healthcare professional before taking any new supplement or medication.

For more information, book a complimentary meet and greet with Dr Eric Viegas today.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do you suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome? What have you tried to help your symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

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Herbal Home Remedies For Ulcerative Colitis - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

Herbal Home Remedies for Ulcerative Colitis

What is Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is a form of irritable bowel disease that targets the end of the large intestine; most notably the rectum and anus. With significant inflammation of the innermost layer of gut tissue, UC causes bloody stools, abdominal pain, weight loss, fever, dehydration, and frequent urges to have a bowel movement. (1)

Some UC bowel movements are “false urges”; this means that although the need to pass stool feels urgent, very little is passed into the toilet bowl. Inflammation is the main culprit in these false urges.

There will be periods of time where UC sufferers will be in symptom “remission”; their bowel movements will improve along with their quality of life, but the tissue in their colon will still be inflamed. Stress and diet triggers will often cause relapses for people with UC. (1)

Complications of UC include anemia (low iron) and colorectal cancer. Relapses are frequent, so doctors and patients must work together to reduce inflammation and pain, and to improve quality of life.

Medications, nutritional supplements, herbs, diet, and surgery are all useful tools for individual cases of UC. Unfortunately, no cure exists, but with the proper diet and lifestyle choices, the risk of UC relapse can be reduced.

Herbal Home Remedies for Ulcerative Colitis

A 2017 systematic review and meta-analysis in the European Journal of Integrative Medicine looked at conventional western and eastern herbal medicines, their effect on relapse rates, and the rates of remission when considering symptoms and endoscopic testing (using a small camera to look inside the colon) in people with UC.

The researchers sifted through 3050 studies and filtered their search to include only the best evidence. In the end, 29 randomised controlled trials that included over 1800 people with UC were selected.

Five single-herb remedies were effective in reducing the risk of relapse and maintaining remission from symptoms:

Curcumin

The first herbal therapy is turmeric or curcumin. Curcumin is an extract of the spice turmeric (aka Curcuma longa), and the recent surge in popularity of “turmeric lattes” may prove beneficial to people with UC.

Curcumin was shown to maintain remission of UC for up to six months and was also helpful in improving quality of life during active UC. (2)

The traditional use of turmeric is as an anti-inflammatory agent for joint pain and liver dysfunction. It is no surprise then that curcumin is an effective anti-inflammatory for UC.

Silymarin

Silymarin, the anti-inflammatory component of the seeds of milk thistle (aka Silybum marianum) also demonstrated remission maintenance in people with UC for up to six months. (2)

Traditionally, silymarin has been used to regenerate diseased liver cells and improve liver function.

Aloe Vera Gel

Aloe vera gel, a commonly used botanical for painful sunburns, was shown to help achieve symptom remission in active UC.

The gel is found inside the long leaves of the aloe vera plant and has been used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory agent for digestive concerns such as ulcers.

Aloe has also demonstrated an ability to stimulate connective tissue formation and wound healing.

Cannabis Oil

A proprietary extract of cannabinoids from cannabis sativa oil, known as GWP42003, was helpful in achieving symptom remission in UC. (2)

Although still not legal for use as an over the counter remedy, these promising results in UC gives hope for the eventual legalisation and greater accessibility of medical marijuana oils in Canada.

Speak with your doctor to find out if this is the right treatment for you.

Andrographis

Andrographis paniculata, known as the “king of bitters” in India, is an excellent digestive tonic for individual cases of gastrointestinal disease. Andrographis was also helpful in achieving symptom remission in active UC. (2)

Commonly used to fight against cold and flu symptoms, Andrographis has anti-viral properties and is now found in most herbal cold and flu remedies.

Green tea

Finally, it’s a good idea to grab a cup of green tea. An antioxidant called Epigallocatechin-3-galate (EGCG) is found in green tea, and people taking EGCG were more likely to achieve UC symptom remission than those taking a placebo. (2)

Another useful property of green tea is the anti-anxiety effect of theanine; an amino acid exclusive to green tea that promotes a relaxed state while not compromising alertness.

UC sufferers often experience mood disorders as a consequence of their disease, so a few cups of green tea a day can go a long way to promoting a better quality of life.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

In combination with standard drug therapy, the Chinese herbal formulas Chan Yu ning syrup/granule, Gu chang zhi xie wan, and Kui jie ling granules, were all shown to improve both symptoms and gut inflammation in active cases of UC. (2)

Licensed acupuncturists and traditional Chinese medicine doctors use their knowledge of pathology and organ systems to formulate a herbal preparation that is individualised to your specific needs.

Everyone is different, and their responses to stressors are different; TCM takes this into account with the use of botanicals and acupuncture to improve health and well-being.

With a long history of botanical medicines in cultures around the world, it is no surprise that herbal remedies exist to treat some of the most prevalent gastrointestinal diseases we face today.

For more information on which remedies are right for you, speak with your naturopathic doctor.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do you suffer from Ulcerative Colitis? What have you tried to help your symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

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Magnesium, Migraines, and Mitochondria

Magnesium, Migraines, and Mitochondria

An estimated 2.7 million Canadians, more women than men, suffer from migraine headaches. A migraine is often a throbbing, one-sided headache with nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to bright lights, or aura. An aura can be a quick disturbance of visual or neurological function, and usually precedes a migraine attack.

Causes for Migraines

There are a few different causes of migraines, and one or more could be at play in individual cases.

Changes in blood vessel pressure

One theory is that blood vessels increase pressure by constricting, and then reactively dilating. This sudden alteration in blood flow can lead to a migraine headache.

Mitochondria

Another theory suggests that issues with mitochondria–the powerhouses of the cell–affect energy production, and causes a migraine.

Medication and stimulants

Tobacco use, caffeine consumption, and birth control pills can increase the frequency of migraines in certain people. It is also worthwhile to check if the side effects of any medications you are taking may be worsening your headaches.

Salt

Too large of an ingestion of salt can lead to a migraine 6-12 hours later.

Food intolerances

A possible underlying cause of migraine headaches is an intolerance to wheat, citrus, eggs, tea, coffee, chocolate, milk, beef, corn, cane sugar, yeast, mushrooms, and/or peas. Elimination of these offending foods for 8 weeks helped 60 migraine patients reduce their frequency of headaches from 402 to just 6 per month.

Magnesium, B vitamins and CoQ10

Interestingly, magnesium is typically deficient in migraine patients. Supplementation of magnesium can improve mitochondrial energy output, and reduce the frequency and/or severity of migraine headaches (5).

Riboflavin (vitamin B2), and Niacinamide (vitamin B3) can be effective for migraine relief as they play important roles in mitochondrial energy production.

Coenzyme Q10 also benefits mitochondria and, as a result, migraine headaches.

Hormonal links

Estrogen has been linked to menstrual migraine headaches, and postmenopausal women may experience a reduction in migraines and tension-type headaches due to a decline in sex hormones.

Serotonin agonists like 5-HTP may acutely relieve and prevent menstrual headaches.

If you suffer from migraines and also have a history of fibromyalgia or myofascial pain syndrome, you may benefit from mitochondrial support, magnesium, and 5-HTP.

An underlying cause of anxiety and insomnia may perpetuate migraine and tension-type headaches amongst postmenopausal women and the general population.

So what can you do about it..??

There are many migraine treatment alternatives; this was just a small summary of strategies for a big headache.

We are all unique, your Naturopathic Doctor can assess the possible causes for your migraines and suggest ways in which they can be relieved by using diet, nutrition and by removing the triggers.

Book a free introductory meet and greet to find out how naturopathic medicine could help your migraines.

Disclaimer

This article in not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do you suffer from Headaches? What have you tried to help your symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

Like what you’ve read? Sign up for FREE updates delivered to your inbox.


By submitting this form, you are granting: Ottawa Holistic Wellness, 356 MacLaren Street, Ottawa, ON, K2P 0M6, permission to email you. You may unsubscribe via the link found at the bottom of every email. (See our Email Privacy Policy (http://constantcontact.com/legal/privacy-statement) for details.) Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.
Insomnia: When Counting Sheep Won’t Help Ewe

Insomnia: When Counting Sheep Won’t Help Ewe

If you have constant trouble sleeping, then chances are you are one of the estimated 3.3 million Canadians struggling with insomnia.

‘Insomnia’ refers to the disruption of time taken to fall asleep, the amount of time asleep (versus time in bed) through the night, waking up too early, and feel unrefreshed on waking.1 Insomnia is incredibly frustrating and can be a fearful prospect knowing that it can lead to impaired memory and concentration.1

As a result, insomnia can predispose you to be more accident-prone at home, on the road, and in the workplace.1

Insomnia exists as its own disorder, but it is also associated with a significant number of physical and mental illnesses. For example, mood disorders like depression and anxiety are both associated with insomnia.1

So what can be done to help you get a better night’s sleep?

First, it is important to identify the underlying cause of your insomnia.

Light and Noise

If you are sensitive to light and sound, make sure your bedroom is as dark as possible and remove any electronics that might be distracting you from falling asleep.

Melatonin

The ‘blue light’ emitted from our TVs, laptops, and mobile phones all affect the release of melatonin from our brains.2

A small amount of melatonin, one of the most well known natural sleep aids, is secreted by your pineal during the day. At night, melatonin secretion spikes to help us get to sleep. Exposure to ‘blue light’ before bed suppresses melatonin secretion and tricks our bodies into thinking we should be awake.2

If you are not willing to give up your bedtime electronics, you can reduce ‘blue light’ exposure by turning down the brightness of the device, and download an app (e.g., Twilight).

The long-term use of benzodiazepine medication for anxiety and panic disorders can deplete the brain’s supply of melatonin.3 Over time, a disruption in circadian rhythm reduces regular sleeping habits.

Melatonin supplementation can help with normalising circadian rhythm and alleviating withdrawal symptoms from anti-anxiety meds.3

Insomnia, fatigue, ADHD, IBS, and breast cancer risk, are all associated with melatonin deficiency.3

Symptoms of fibromyalgia, bulimia, neuralgia, certain forms of depression, and certain postmenopausal problems improve with melatonin supplementation.3

Other causes

Other common underlying causes of insomnia include mood disorders, hormone imbalance, sleep apnea, chronic pain, and exercising too close to bedtime.

Cortisol and Adrenal fatigue

The need to be busy has left us overworked and overtired.

When our bodies are in a constant state of stress, our systems shift from ‘rest and digest’ to ‘fight or flight?’.

As a consequence, our adrenal glands secrete more cortisol; a hormone responsible for increasing blood sugar, and the breakdown of fat & muscle, for the energy to get us away from danger. Normally, cortisol spikes in the morning to get us out of bed, and is very low at night to help us fall asleep.

In a chronically stressed state, high cortisol will worsen insomnia and, if left untreated, will eventually lead to adrenal fatigue.

We are here to help

Speak to your naturopathic doctor about your health concerns to assist in determining the underlying cause(s) and help tailor a treatment plan specific to your individual needs. Acupuncture, nutritional changes through diet and supplements, counselling, and sleep hygiene advice are all parts of naturopathic treatment that can help get you back to sleep and leave you feeling well rested.

References:

  1. Tjepkema M. “Insomnia”. Statistics Canada Health Reports. 2005 17(1): 9-25.
  2. Schmerler, Jessica. “Q&A Why is Blue Light Before Bed Bad For Sleep?” Scientific American. Nature America, September 2015.
  3. Rohr UD, Herold J. “Melatonin deficiencies in women.” 2002 Apr 15(41): 85-10.
Treatment Options for Fatigue - Ottawa Holistic Wellness

Treatment Options for Fatigue

There are many reasons why we experience fatigue.

A physiological issue may cause fatigue such as impaired thyroid function, lack of nutrition, hormone imbalance, lack of sleep, chronic pain or allergies among others. Emotional stresses and past traumas can also trigger fatigue.

A physiological issue may cause fatigue such as impaired thyroid function, lack of nutrition, hormone imbalance, lack of sleep, chronic pain or allergies among others. Emotional stresses and past traumas can also trigger fatigue.

Whether the reason is physiological or psychological, we can all benefit from some help to identify and resolve the underlying issues.

Physiological Issues

The first step might be to investigate any physiological issues.

Family doctors and Western medicine. Your family physician can order various tests to rule out certain diseases and to identify nutritional deficiencies such as Vit D or B12 deficiency and anaemia (low iron). They also have access to pharmaceuticals which can address symptoms and bring relief. They are not always able to get to the cause of your fatigue but can help to alleviate it.

Naturopathic or Functional Medicine. These doctors work with your family doctor. They look deeper, at root causes of ill health, and address issues such as lifestyle, diet, hormone imbalance, insomnia, allergies, celiac disease and digestive health. They use natural healing methods including diet, nutrition, lifestyle modification, acupuncture, homeopathy and herbal remedies.

Emotional reasons for fatigue

Once physiological causes have been dealt with or ruled out, you may wish to consider psychological causes for your fatigue. Whether it is from past traumas, genetic memories from previous generations or current stresses in your life, we all need some help to release these.
Some modalities to consider are as follows:

Counselling and psychotherapy can approach these emotions from the conscious mind. Make sure to choose someone that you are completely comfortable with, and has suitably experience in your type of issue.

Hypnotherapy works with your subconscious mind. During a session, you collaborate to access the subconscious, let go of the restrictions and limitations provided by the conscious mind, and bring about the release and shift of those trapped emotions. The majority of people will remain aware of their surroundings to some degree.

CranioSacral therapy accesses these traumas and emotions from the body level. A good CS therapist will sense the shock and trauma resonating in your body even after your conscious mind thinks it has been resolved. They work extremely gently, facilitating the release of these emotions and bringing the body back into balance.

Reiki, Chakra balancing and energy healing all work with your body’s energy to rebalance, release trapped emotions, bring calm and profound relaxation. During a healing session the body enters a parasympathetic state, also called the rest and digest state, which is responsible for long-term health, improved digestion, conservation of energy, and maintenance of a healthy balance in your body’s systems

Physical Treatments

Misalignment and imbalance in your body will upset the correct functioning of many of the body’s systems.

Chiropractic, Massage and Osteopathy all work with the physical body including the muscles, ligaments, spine, joints and organs, releasing these tensions and bringing balance to your structure. Working on your physical body will allow your body to work in the most optimal way and healing to take place.

These therapies also address physical pain. Relief from chronic pain can go a long way towards improving energy levels.

Acupuncture is one modality that can help both physiological and emotional issues. It is an ancient method that rebalances the body, allowing the correct function of all your body’s symptoms and healing to take place. It can be used initially for symptom relief and longer term to bring lasting healing.

Want to know what’s best for you? Book for a free, no obligation introductory health coach session to discuss your needs.

Disclaimer

This article in not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Now I would like to hear from you. Do you suffer from Fatigue? What have you tried to help your symptoms? Let us know in the comments below.

Like what you’ve read? Sign up for FREE updates delivered to your inbox.


By submitting this form, you are granting: Ottawa Holistic Wellness, 356 MacLaren Street, Ottawa, ON, K2P 0M6, permission to email you. You may unsubscribe via the link found at the bottom of every email. (See our Email Privacy Policy (http://constantcontact.com/legal/privacy-statement) for details.) Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.
Anxiety Disorders: What Are Your Options?

Anxiety Disorders: What Are Your Options?

Anxiety disorders affect 1 in 4 Canadians at some point in their lives, making anxiety the most common mental illness in Canada.

Psychotherapy and benzodiazepine medication are the conventional treatment options for anxiety. However, benzodiazepine drugs carry a high rate of addiction potential, can make people feel sedated, and bring an extensive list of side effects.

So what can be done about anxiety if you want to pursue other treatment options?

First and foremost, it’s important to identify the source(s) and trigger(s) of your anxiety.

What makes it better or worse? Is it a social setting that triggers a panic attack? A big test that you’re studying for that’s causing general anxiety?

Understand your anxiety

The importance of understanding your anxiety, rather than avoiding it, carries with it a significant mental and physical benefit. Our brains have the ability to tell the difference between suppressing our emotions versus addressing and labelling them. It is okay to feel anxious.  

Learning from our anxieties offers the opportunity for better self-understanding. When we understand why we react with anxiety, we learn from our thoughts, behaviours, and actions. Identify and label how you are feeling, and you’ll find that your mood won’t have as much of an impact on your daily function.

Proper sleep, a healthy diet, good social support, and a lifestyle that includes plenty of physical activity all factor into your well-being when dealing with anxiety.

The importance of nutrition

A diet deficient in certain amino acids, vitamins, and minerals can have an adverse impact on your mental-emotional well-being.

Individual amino acids, vitamins, and minerals can help to calm an overactive mind through calming your nervous system and correcting vitamin and mineral deficiencies that might worsen anxiety. In fact, even low iron can contribute to anxiety.

An adequate intake of protein from both animal and vegetable sources can help with amino acid intake and improved blood sugar control.

Stable blood sugar levels can be achieved through the consumption of healthy fats like olive oil, coconut oil, avocados, nuts, and seeds.

Fibre from fruits and vegetables can stabilise blood sugar, and add vitamins and minerals to your diet.

It is important to avoid packaged foods that contain high amounts of simple sugars when trying to control your blood sugar.

Natural remedies

Lavender is an excellent anti-anxiety herb, acting on your nervous system to calm your body and mind. In trials involving adults with anxiety, lavender was found to be as beneficial as benzodiazepine medication in alleviating feelings of restlessness and improving sleep.

You can even stuff lavender buds in your pillowcases to help with restlessness during the night.

Green tea also helps with feelings of anxiety thanks to theanine. It’s an amino acid that can contribute to reducing feelings of stress, promote relaxation, and help with attention.

Green tea and lavender are just a couple of the many alternative treatments for anxiety. Ask your naturopathic doctor about other natural remedies.

Other factors

Other factors that can contribute to anxiety include (but are not limited to): thyroid disease, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, digestive disorders, substance abuse, allergies, depression, and other mental illnesses.

It’s important to speak with your medical or naturopathic doctor to determine the underlying factors influencing your own anxiety, and discuss what treatment alternatives are right for you.

Book with me now and find out about natural approaches to resolving anxiety.